Turner’s Corner, Woodinville


Intersection of Maltby Road and State Route 9, Woodinville

Just a few minutes away from Thrasher’s Corner, Turner’s Corner, located at the intersection of Maltby Road and State Route 9, was the home of the Turner family who owned the surrounding 160 acres. (88) Edgar Turner was born on December 31, 1862, in Gallia County, Ohio. In 1885, he and his sister, Mary, took a train to Seattle. He taught at schools wherever he could before settling at Turner’s Corner in 1888. (89) Once in Bothell, Edgar became the first teacher at the North Creek School (circa 1902; National Register 1995), which is now located in Centennial Park near Thrasher’s Corner. (90)

Turner’s home was on the southwest corner of Maltby Road and State Route 9. (91) At first, he had to swim the river to reach his property. (92) Between 1886 and 1888, Edgar and Mary’s parents, Jonathan Collins Turner and Penina Davis (Craig) Turner, and the rest of the family—James, Belle, Frank, Homer, and Alice— moved to the homestead. (93) Frank and James were farmers. Belle, Alice, and Homer were all teachers, but Homer was also a lawyer and longshoreman. Only James, Edgar, and Homer married and had children; the other siblings remained single. (94)

On July 25, 1900, Edgar married Elva Nettleton. Elva was born February 5, 1863, in Delaware County, Ohio. Her parents were Colonel Stiles Rust Nettleton and Alameda Orline (Mills) Nettleton. The Nettleton family moved from Ohio to Seattle, via Minnesota, in 1890. (95) The Nettletons were a prominent family; Stiles and Alameda moved their seven children to Seattle in 1889 and eventually settled in Kirkland. Stiles was a Major in the Civil War, he also worked for the federal and Washington State governments, as well as the Minneapolis Tribune. The Nettletons’ four daughters became teachers. Their son, Clark M. Nettleton, was also the secretary to Leigh S.J. Hunt, the founder of Kirkland and former owner of the Post-Intelligencer.

Eventually, Clark owned the Post-Intelligencer as well as a 1914 mansion on State Street in Kirkland. (96)

Elva died of peritonitis in 1913. (97) After she died, Edgar raised their four children—Clark, Mary, George, and Craig Mills—alone. Edgar Turner died in 1929 of “acute indigestion.” (98) On the day of his death—May 6, 1929—Elva’s sister Rie (Marie) wrote in her diary “Ed died this morning at 3 at Seattle General.” (99)

Elva and Edgar’s daughter, Mary Turner Sween documented some of her family’s history. According to her notes, Edgar and Frank Turner slept in an empty stump when they first arrived at what became Turner’s Corner. They later built a cabin that was only accessible by a narrow trail and would often take the Sammamish River to Woodinville. However, if the boat was on the opposite shore, they would have to strip down and swim to get it. When Edgar wasn’t teaching, he was clearing his land with a team of oxen or helping to build the railroad. For fun, he and his brothers attended the local square dances that often lasted all night. Edgar met Elva through his sister Alice, who was friends with Elva’s sister, Mabel. (100)

By 1900, Edgar built the first Turner house. His garden was famous; he even sent his mother back to Ohio for daffodil bulbs. Elva’s sister, Marie, received some of his primroses. (101) In 1921, the house was destroyed in a fire. The family wasn’t home, but neighbors were able to save the furnishings on the first floor. It is believed that the fire was started by a hot flatiron that was left in one of the beds on the second floor. (102) The new house was built by 1925. (103)

When Edgar died, he left his 160 acres to be divided between his four children. Mary inherited the 40 acres with the family home, while George and Craig each received 20 acres along Snohomish Road and 20 acres along the back of the property. Clark also received 40 acres. Edgar’s parents and his siblings, Frank and Alice, had their own property northwest of Turner’s Corner. Mary (Edgar’s sister, not daughter) sold her share in 1895. (104)

On July 29, 1929, Mary Turner (daughter) married Severin Anfeldt Sween. They had two children; one of their daughters is named Elva. Mary died in 1970. (105) Severin was born in Minnesota, in 1901, to Carl Sween and Jettie Bergetta Haga Sween. He died in 1981. (106) Severin’s sister, Alix, was married to Clark Turner. (107)

(Additional research provided by Elva Whiting, who is writing her family’s history.)

(88) Farnum, Carolyn, “Edgar Charles Turner. Findarave.com, March 5, 2001
(89) Ibid
(90) Parkhurst, Patricia, “North Creek School.” City of Bothell Local Register of Historic Landmarks, 2008
(91) Whiting, Elva, Email to Lauren Perez Hoogkamer. October 10- 15, 2013
(92) Farnum, Carolyn, “Edgar Charles Turner. Findarave.com, March 5, 2001
(93) Miller, Chris, “A Look at the Naming of Northshore.” Citizens Newspaper, April 24, 1984
(94) Whiting, Elva, Email to Lauren Perez Hoogkamer. October 10- 15, 2013
(95) Farnum, Carolyn, “Elva N Nettleton Turner.” Findagrave.com, March 5, 2001
(96) Hawkinson, Loita, “Col. Stiles & Almeda Nettleton.” Blackberry Preserves: The Journal of the Kirkland Heritage Society, 20:5, Sept/Oct 2013. pp. 4-5
(97) Farnum, Carolyn, “Elva N Nettleton Turner.” Findagrave.com, March 5, 2001
(98) Farnum, Carolyn, “Edgar Charles Turner. Findarave.com, March 5, 2001
(99) Nettleton, Maria, Diary Entry. May 6, 1929
(100) Sween, Mary Turner, Notes. No date
(101) Sween, Mary Turner, Notes. No date
(102) “Fire at Snohomish Destroys Landmark,” Seattle Post Intelligencer. December 24, 1921
(103) Whiting, Elva, Email to Lauren Perez Hoogkamer. October 10- 15, 2013
(104) Sween, Mary Turner, Notes. No date
(105) “Mary Turner Sween”, findagrave.com. May 13, 2013
(106) “Severin Anfeldt Sween,” Findagrave.com. May 13, 2013
(107) “Carl Joseph Sween,” Findagrave.com. May 13, 2013

  • North Creek School, early 1900s (Bothell Register of Historic Landmarks)

    North Creek School, early 1900s (Bothell Register of Historic Landmarks)

  • North Creek School, early 1900s (Bothell Register of Historic Landmarks)

    North Creek School, early 1900s (Bothell Register of Historic Landmarks)

  • North Creek School (Hoogkamer, 2013)

    North Creek School (Hoogkamer, 2013)

  • LEFT: Edgar Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: Homer Turner and Wife (Citizens Newspaper, 1984)

    LEFT: Edgar Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: Homer Turner and Wife (Citizens Newspaper, 1984)

  • LEFT: Clark Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: George Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

    LEFT: Clark Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: George Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

  • Clark, Jonathan, Mary, Penina Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

    Clark, Jonathan, Mary, Penina Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

  • Penina Craig Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

    Penina Craig Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

  • Mary Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

    Mary Turner, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

  • Edgar, Elva, Mary, Craig, George, and Clark Turner in Kirkland; circa 1908 (Elva Whiting)

    Edgar, Elva, Mary, Craig, George, and Clark Turner in Kirkland; circa 1908 (Elva Whiting)

  • Craig, George, Mary, and Clark Turner on Old Min, circa 1910 (Elva Whiting)

    Craig, George, Mary, and Clark Turner on Old Min, circa 1910 (Elva Whiting)

  • George, Clark, Mary, and Craig Turner, circa 1912 (Elva Whiting)

    George, Clark, Mary, and Craig Turner, circa 1912 (Elva Whiting)

  • Dick Sween and the Turner Chicken Coops, 1939 (Elva Whiting)

    Dick Sween and the Turner Chicken Coops, 1939 (Elva Whiting)

  • LEFT: Mary Turner, 1917 and CENTER:1927 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: Mary Turner and Severin Sween’s Wedding, 1929 (Elva Whiting)

    LEFT: Mary Turner, 1917 and CENTER:1927 (Elva Whiting), RIGHT: Mary Turner and Severin Sween’s Wedding, 1929 (Elva Whiting)

  • Mary Sween, Elva, Everett, and Ethel Whiting; Severin Sween, 1957 (Elva Whiting)

    Mary Sween, Elva, Everett, and Ethel Whiting; Severin Sween, 1957 (Elva Whiting)

  • Mary Sween, 1957 (Elva Whiting)

    Mary Sween, 1957 (Elva Whiting)

  • (Blackberry Preserves: The Journal of the Kirkland Heritage Society, 2013)

    (Blackberry Preserves: The Journal of the Kirkland Heritage Society, 2013)

  • First Turner Home, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

    First Turner Home, 1905 (Elva Whiting)

  • New Turner Home, 1925 (Elva Whiting)

    New Turner Home, 1925 (Elva Whiting)

  • S.R. Nettleton Home in 1920. Alice is on the porch.

    S.R. Nettleton Home in 1920. Alice is on the porch.

Poem by Mary Turner, 1905

I was awful naughty,
     stayin’.
Out in the garden
     playin’
After Mother called
     me in
I’ll be punished now;
Sittin’ in the
     corner now
Guess I won’t be
     bad again.

Cow Poem by Clark Turner, 1905

Oh step back, quickly
My cow’s going to kick.
When you come to the farm
You’ll surely do harm,
If you don’t know how
To keep away from the cow